Xap2

                     Hsp2

                   

Xap2

 

 

 

 

Caspase7

 

 
                                         

 

 

The dioxin receptor (DR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is activated upon binding of dioxins or structurally related forms of xenobiotics. Upon binding ligand the DR translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where it complexes with the partner protein Arnt to form a DNA binding heterodimer, which activates transcription of target genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Latency of the DR signaling pathway is maintained by association of the DR with a number of molecular chaperones including the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90), the hepatitis B virus X-associated protein (XAP2), and the 23-kDa heat shock protein (p23). Here we investigated the role of XAP2 in DR signaling and demonstrated that reduced levels of XAP2 labilize the DR, arguing for a function of XAP2 beyond its reported role as a cytoplasmic retention factor. In addition, we showed that a constitutively nuclear DR is degraded in the nucleus and does not require nuclear export for efficient degradation. We also provided evidence implicating the ubiquitin ligase protein C-terminal hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) in the degradation of the DR, and we demonstrated that this degradation can be overcome by overexpression of XAP2. XAP2 protection of CHIP-mediated degradation is dependent on the tetratricopeptide repeat domain of XAP2 and suggests a mechanism whereby competition for the C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat acceptor site of hsp90 guides the protein triage decision, the point of determination for either maturation of DR folding or DR degradation.

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